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Combine Nepal with India, Bhutan and Tibet

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Nepal and our neighbours

Nepal’s history has been hugely influenced by its landlocked position between India and the Tibetan region of China, whilst nearby Bhutan offers a glimpse into a culture like nowhere else on earth. If you’re planning a longer stay in this part of Asia, you can combine your time in Nepal with a visit to one of our neighbours.

Our partners at Royal Mountain Travel can give advice on planning your multi-country adventure, as well as helping with tour and transport bookings to make sure you travel as smoothly as possible.

Combining Nepal with India

India and Nepal share so much in terms of history and culture, but most people notice our differences as soon as they cross the border. The Indian ‘hustle’ is famous, and the explosion of sights, sounds and smells in most Indian cities can be both intoxicating and a little overwhelming for some. Outside of the cities, this vast country holds spectacular mountain landscapes, wild jungles and incredible beaches in the south.

Getting there : There are flight routes between most major Indian cities and Kathmandu, as well as land crossings at Bhairahawa Border, Raxaul Border, Nepalgunj Border, Biratnagar Border, Kakarvitta Border, and Mahendranagar Border. If travelling by land, make sure you do your research or book tours and transport in advance.

Things to note : Visas for Nepal are pretty simple for most nationalities, and can be issued on arrival at the airport. This is also true at some land borders, but not all, so you may wish to apply in advance via http://online.nepalimmigration.gov.np/ to be on the safe side.

India does not issue visas on arrival for most foreign travellers, and you should check and apply in advance via https://indianvisaonline.gov.in/evisa/tvoa.html.

Combining Nepal with Bhutan

Landlocked in the eastern Himalayas, the Kingdom of Bhutan shares some similarities with Nepal, but in many ways it is a country which cannot be compared to anywhere else. Here, traditional Buddhism is closely followed, and the country’s success is judged on Gross National Happiness. You’ll find strange coloured food, giant penis statues everywhere and protected forests covering around 70% of the entire country. Bhutan is one of the only carbon-positive countries in the world, and you can’t help but fall for its unusual charms.

Getting there : Bhutan has one international airport, Paro, which connects directly with Kathmandu and various other cities across Asia. Most flights will be with Drukair or Bhutan Airlines.

You can also enter by land from India, via Phuntsholing in the west or Samdrup Jongkhar in the east.

Things to note : Tourism is closely managed and highly sustainable in Bhutan, and foreign visitors must pay a minimum daily tariff of US$250 per day during their stay. This includes all of your accommodation, food, transport and an official guide. You don’t have to join a big group tour and you’ll be able to create your own itinerary, but this must be done in advance, along with your visa application.

Travel Nepal partners with one of Bhutan’s official tourism companies, so please get in touch if you’d like some help putting your Bhutan trip together.

Combining Nepal with Tibet (China)

The people of Tibet have always been synonymous with Nepal, and Tibetan heritage and influences remain an important part of Nepali culture. The land itself has a long and storied history, and has spent many years virtually cut-off from the outside world, giving it a special appeal for adventurous travellers. Spectacular, untouched landscapes await, along with tribal communities which have barely changed in centuries.

Getting there : There are daily flights to Lhasa from Kathmandu, or you can cross with a stunning road journey through the Himalayas in Gyirong County. Most other access points for Tibet are from China.

Things to note : Tibet is an autonomous region of China, so you will need to apply for a China visa in advance. You’ll also need to obtain a Tibet Travel Permit, which can be especially difficult to do if you’re planning on travelling Tibet independently. Most Tibet tours will include help getting your permit.

Explore Tibet with Royal Mountain

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